/policies/,/policies/clinical/,/policies/clinical/uwhc-clinical/,/policies/clinical/uwhc-clinical/department-specific/,/policies/clinical/uwhc-clinical/department-specific/respiratory-care-services/,/policies/clinical/uwhc-clinical/department-specific/respiratory-care-services/patient-assessment/,

/policies/clinical/uwhc-clinical/department-specific/respiratory-care-services/patient-assessment/320.policy

201511313

page

100

UWHC,

Policies,Clinical,UWHC Clinical,Department Specific,Respiratory Care Services,Patient Assessment

Pulse Oximetry Check & Continuous Monitoring (Includes Ambulating SPO2) (3.20)

Pulse Oximetry Check & Continuous Monitoring (Includes Ambulating SPO2) (3.20) - Policies, Clinical, UWHC Clinical, Department Specific, Respiratory Care Services, Patient Assessment

3.20

3.20 Pulse Oximetry Check & Continuous Monitoring (Includes Ambulating SPO2) 
Category:   UWHC Clinical Policy 
Policy Number:   3.20 
Effective Date:   November 1, 2015 
Manual:   Respiratory Care Services 
Version:  Revision 
Section:  Patient Assessment 

I.  PURPOSE 
 
  Oximetry is a non‐invasive method of measuring/monitoring arterial oxygen saturation. 
  
II.  POLICY 
  
  Continuous Oximetry 
   A.  The use of continuous oximetry in general care requires a provider’s order. 
B.  An oximeter linked to the nurse call system must be used when providing continuous      
  oximetry in general care  
C.  The following guidelines for appropriate utilization of continuous oximetry in general care should be 
considered. 
1.  Patients with a significant probability of respiratory depression/failure. 
2.  Post‐operative patients at risk of developing sleep apnea until recovered from 
anesthesia. 
3.  Patients requiring procedural sedation until recovered from sedation.  These include 
patients receiving sedation by any route including neuraxial sedation (epidural, spinal, 
caudal catheter or single shots). 
4.  Patients on the Trauma Service during the first 24 hours of hospitalization. 
5.  Patients with dysfunctional ventricular shunts. (At risk for respiratory depression due to 
increased intracranial pressure.) 
  6.  Patients with dysfunctional baclofen pumps (at risk for respiratory depression due to 
muscle relaxation/hypotonia.). 
7.  Patients with deteriorating respiratory status while awaiting transfer to an IMC or ICU. 
  D.  The following groups of patients may benefit from monitoring via continuous oximetry: 
1.  Patients receiving continuous intravenous narcotics, intermittent narcotics or analgesia 
with agents that depress respiration, and narcotic patches.  
  2.  Patients with cyanotic heart disease (may require management of pulmonary artery 
pressure by limiting hemoglobin saturation to a specified range). 
E.  The location of reusable oximeter sensors should be changed every 8 hours if they are being used for 
continuous monitoring. 
F.  All patients that receive CPAP or BiPAP at night and with naps must be placed on continuous pulse 
oximetry that is linked to the nurse call system. 
G.  To determine a patient’s home oxygen prescription, inpatient oximetry must be done within 48 hours 
of discharge due to reimbursement requirements. 
 
Ambulating Oximetry  
   
A.  Respiratory Care performs ambulating oximetry in a variety of settings including inpatient areas 
and the ambulatory clinics.  Ambulating oximetry will be ordered for: 
1.  Determination of home O
2
 prescription. 
2.  Lung transplant patients. 
3.  Pulmonary hypertension patients 
4.  Diagnosis of PCP pneumonia. 
 

   B.  Hold ambulation if: 
  1.  Resting heart rate >130. 
  2.  Consistent desaturation < 88% despite significant increases in FiO
2

C.  Falsely high readings may occur with: 
  1.  Excessive ambient light 
  2.  Carboxyhemoglobin greater than 4%. 
  3.  Heavy (2‐3 packs/day) smoker 
  4.  Smoke inhalation 
  5.  Methemoglobin 
  D.  Falsely low readings may occur with: 
  1.  Ambient temperature outside the range 0‐45 degrees Celsius. 
  2.  Peripheral vasoconstriction secondary to hypothermia, hypotension, Raynaud’s disease 
or hypovolemia. 
  E.   Outpatient oximetry for prescriptive purposes must be done within 30 days to qualify for an 
oxygen prescription. 
  F.   Inpatient oximetry for prescriptive purposes must be done within 48 hours of discharge to 
qualify for an oxygen prescription. 
 
III.  EQUIPMENT 
 
  A.  Oximeter with appropriate sensor. 
B.  For Ambulation:  
1.  A battery operated oximeter. 
2.  A measuring wheel to measure distance when doing ambulating oximetry for transplant 
patients. 
3.  Portable oxygen equipment. 
 
IV.  PROCEDURE 
 
A.  Determine whether the ambulating oximetry is for home oxygen needs, or a lung transplant patient. 
1.  For home oxygen prescriptions, see related link “Ambulating Oximetry Procedure for 
Home Oxygen Prescription.” 
2.  For lung transplant patients, see related link “Six Minute Walk for Lung Transplant 
Patients.” 
  
V.  DOCUMENTATION 
 
A. Spot checks and continuous oximetry are documented on the RC flow sheet. 
B. Ambulating oximetry is documented on the Ambulating Oximetry Test Form, and placed into the Patient 
Progress Notes. 
C. Overnight oximetry results are uploaded into the medical record and can be found in the 
Procedure/Diagnostic Test tab. 
 
 
VI.  REFERENCES 
 
A.  Respiratory Care P&P 3.21, Nocturnal Oximetry Studies 
B.  Related link “Ambulating oximetry Procedure for Home Oxygen Prescription.” 
C.  Related link “Six Minute Walk for Lung Transplant Candidates.” 
D.   Related link “Six Minute Walk for Post‐Lung Transplant Patients.” 
E.   American Thoracic Society 
 
 

Approved by Director and Medical Director of Respiratory Care.    
 
A copy of this Policy & Procedure is available in the Respiratory Care Office [E5/489].