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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Stroke

Coiling or Clipping an Aneurysm (6751)

Coiling or Clipping an Aneurysm (6751) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Stroke

6751



Coiling or Clipping an Aneurysm


What is an Aneurysm?
An aneurysm is a weak spot in your blood
vessel that has filled with blood like a
balloon. It forms a blood filled sac. This
weak sac can leak blood into your brain
causing brain injury. It can be fatal. To
prevent or stop this sac from leaking, a
doctor (neurosurgeon) will decide with you
and your family to do one of two things,
either clip or coil the aneurysm.

What is a Coiling?
Coiling is a surgical procedure to fill the
aneurysm with coils and keep it from
leaking blood into the brain. This is done by
a doctor (a neuro-radiologist) who inserts a
small tube (catheter) into the groin area just
above your leg. The tube is guided through
your blood vessels until it reaches the
aneurysm. Several small coils are released
by the tube right into the aneurysm. This
will cause blood to clot or harden inside of
the aneurysm which will stop blood from
coming into or leaking out of the aneurysm.




















Possible Problems
- Aneurysm may rupture during
treatment
- Damage to the artery and bleeding
into the brain
- Weakness of an arm or a leg
- Speech problems
- Vision problems
- Confusion, memory loss and/or
seizures
- Vasospasm
- Infection

If there are no problems, after 24 to 48
hours, you will be transferred to the
neurological nursing unit. You will be
monitored closely as you begin to move
around more. In a few days you will be
given directions about caring for yourself
and you will be sent home.

If there are problems or bleeding in the
brain, your hospital stay could be 14-20 days
or more in the Neuroscience Intensive Care
Unit (NICU).




















2

What is a Clipping?
You and your family, along with the doctor
may decide to clip the aneurysm. The
doctor creates a surgical opening into the
brain and finds the aneurysm with special
instruments. Once the aneurysm is found,
tiny clips, will be placed and secured at the
base of the aneurysm. Because of the clip,
no more blood is able to get into the
aneurysm. Then the blood within the
aneurysm will clot which will prevent it
from leaking. Sometimes, the doctor will
take the blood out of the aneurysm using
suction, like when you deflate a balloon.

Possible Problems
- Infection
- Stroke
- Seizure
- Swelling in the brain
- Vasospasm
- Bleeding in the brain

If there are no problems, after 24 to 48
hours, you will be transferred to the
neurological nursing unit. You will be
watched closely as you begin to move
around more. In a few days you’ll be given
directions about caring for yourself and
you’ll be sent home.

If there are problems or bleeding in the
brain, the hospital stay could be 14-20 days
or more in the Neuroscience Intensive Care
Unit (NICU).












Resources

American Association of Neuroscience Nurses Guidelines Series, (2012) Care of the Patient with
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.
Retrieved from http://www.aann.org/apps/ws_downloads/download.php?task=submit

Kassell NF, Sasaski T., Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Hemorrhage. Stroke.
1985; 16: 562-572.






Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 8/2016. University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#6751.