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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Psychosocial, Bereavement, Psychiatry

Orthostatic Hypotension (7747)

Orthostatic Hypotension (7747) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Psychosocial, Bereavement, Psychiatry

7747



Orthostatic Hypotension

This handout explains orthostatic hypotension. It can happen when there is a drop in blood pressure
caused by a change in position. You may be at higher risk of falling if you have this condition.

Symptoms
ξ Dizziness
ξ Weakness
ξ Not thinking clearly/confusion
ξ Blurred vision
ξ Headache
ξ Fainting
ξ Fatigue
ξ Nausea
ξ Rapid pulse

Risk factors
ξ Age
ξ Those who have been in bed for a
long time
ξ Some medicines
ξ Poor fluid intake
ξ Certain heart conditions

Keeping You Safe in the Hospital
ξ Ask for help before getting up.
ξ Get up slowly.
ξ Stay hydrated. Ask your health care
team if you have limits on how much
fluid you can drink.
ξ Raise the head of the bed 10-20
degrees.



ξ Learn about your conditions and
medicines.
ξ Ask your health care team about
walking in your room and the halls
to stay active.
ξ Do not take hot showers in the early
morning.
ξ Think about using a chair in the
shower.
ξ You may need to wear support
stockings to help with swelling in
your legs.
ξ Your blood pressure may be checked
often.

It is also important that you are safe when
you go home. Be sure that you ask for help
as needed. Use equipment to help you move
around and in the shower if needed. Ask
your health care team about medicines that
put you at higher risk.












Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 4/2016 University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#7747