/clinical/,/clinical/pted/,/clinical/pted/hffy/,/clinical/pted/hffy/parenting/,

/clinical/pted/hffy/parenting/7935.hffy

201610287

page

100

UWHC,UWMF,

Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Pediatrics, Parenting

Getting Ready for Your Child’s Zolendronic Acid (Reclast, Zometa) Infusion (7935)

Getting Ready for Your Child’s Zolendronic Acid (Reclast, Zometa) Infusion (7935) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Pediatrics, Parenting

7935


Getting Ready for Your Child’s Zolendronic Acid (Reclast, Zometa)
Infusion
The first infusion of a medicine called
Zolendronic Acid is given at the American
Family Children’s Hospital with an
overnight (23 hour) stay.
After that they are given every 6 months in
the pediatric diagnostic and procedure center
at the American Family Children’s Hospital.
To get ready for each infusion your child
takes these medicines for 7 days before.
1. Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D)
___________units daily
2. Calcium supplement
___________mg three times daily

The day of the infusion
ξ Your child will have an intravenous
IV placed and blood work done
before the infusion starts.
ξ Acetaminophen and/ or ibuprofen is
given before the infusion and every 6
hours in the hospital and the first day
at home.
ξ The medicine is given through the IV
over about 1 hour
ξ During the first infusion it is likely
that your child will have flu-like
ξ symptoms such as fever, chills
muscle aches, body aches, joint or
bone pain, or headaches, lasting 1-2
days. It is uncommon to have these
symptoms for future infusions.

Between infusions
ξ Blood work is done at your local
clinic every 3 months
A bone density scan is ordered by
your doctor to monitor effects of the
medicine and if your child has bone
pain or a broken bone.
Infusions and clinic visits
Zolenronic Acid infusions are done every 6
months in the pediatric diagnostic and
procedure center.
ξ Each year one of your child’s
infusions is coordinated with an
appointment in the pediatric bone
clinic.
ξ During the other infusion a
nephrology provider will see your
child in the pediatric diagnostic and
procedure center.

Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 10/2016 University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing HF#7935.