/clinical/,/clinical/pted/,/clinical/pted/hffy/,/clinical/pted/hffy/parenting/,

/clinical/pted/hffy/parenting/7712.hffy

201711317

page

100

UWHC,UWMF,

Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Pediatrics, Parenting

Using Pediatric Pain Scales Faces Legs Activity Cry Consolability Revised Scale (FLACC-R) (7712)

Using Pediatric Pain Scales Faces Legs Activity Cry Consolability Revised Scale (FLACC-R) (7712) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Pediatrics, Parenting

7712


Using Pediatric Pain Scales
Faces Legs Activity Cry Consolability Revised Scale (FLACC-R)

At UW Health we care about your child’s
comfort. You are an important member of
your child’s healthcare team. You know
your child best. We want to partner with you
to help control your child’s pain. If you
have questions or concerns, please speak up
and let your child’s nurse know. While we
may not be able to make your child pain
free, this is what we can do.
ξ Assess your child’s pain. This is the
first step to understand and treat
pain.
o We use pain scales based on
the child’s age, ability to
communicate and preference.
We work with you and your
child to decide which one
works best. The pain scale
you choose is used the whole
time your child is in the
hospital unless your child’s
condition changes.
ξ Work with you and your child to
come up with a goal for pain control.
ξ Learn what has worked before to
control your child’s pain and put that
information in your child’s plan of
care.
ξ Use medicine and non-drug methods
to control your child’s pain.
ξ Teach you about other methods you
can use to control your child’s pain.
Often a combination of medicine and
comfort methods will give the best pain
relief.
If you think medicine is needed, please let
your child’s nurse know. In the hospital a
doctor must order pain medicine before a
nurse can give it to a patient. Your child’s
nurse works with you to decide what is
needed. In clinic your child’s doctor or nurse
talks with you about pain medicine plan.
You can start using some simple methods if
your child seems uncomfortable or in pain.
These methods are often able to provide
comfort and distraction that may decrease
your child’s pain. At the hospital we have
options to provide pain control without
medicine. The nurse, nursing assistant or
child life therapist can work with you to
choose the best tools for your child. They
can also give you tips about how to use the
tools that are chosen. We also have another
Health Fact for You titled Non-drug Pain
Control for Kids that gives tips based on
your child’s age. These methods can be
used with or without medicine. Pain control
research teaches us that the best pain control
happens when we combine medicines that
work in different ways, and non-drug
methods of pain control. We suggest you try
these non-drug methods with your child
when you feel they may be helpful.
Faces Legs Activity Cry Consolability
Revised Scale (FLACC-R)

The FLACC-R Scale is used for children
older than one year that cannot report their
pain. Research suggests to us that the most
accurate report of pain is from the person in
pain. But children often are not able to
report their pain. Sometimes they cannot
report their pain because they are too young
to speak or understand what is being asked.
Some children may never really understand
how to report their pain. We use the
(FLACC-R) to help us to decide if children
are having pain when they cannot tell us.
This scale has been researched and shown to
be helpful for children with developmental
delays.

A child is evaluated and either scored a 0, 1
or 2 in each category based on their
behavior. A total score is calculated. This

scale helps us to know if it is likely the child
is experiencing pain or discomfort. Often
methods to reduce pain are started when the
score is 3 or greater than 3. Comfort
methods, or non-drug methods can be
started any time to help keep your child
comfortable.

If you notice other behaviors that tell you
your child is in pain, please share this
information with your child’s nurse.

If you think your child is in pain, you could
try some comfort methods listed below.
ξ Repositioning
ξ Singing or soft music
ξ Gentle stroking
ξ Rocking with your child in a rocking
chair
ξ Watching a movie
ξ Reading a book
ξ Heat or cold
ξ Other methods you use at home to
comfort your child

Faces Legs Activity Cry Consolability Revised Scale (FLACC-R)

Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 11/2017 University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#7712