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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Pain

Botulinum Toxin Injections (7950)

Botulinum Toxin Injections (7950) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Pain

7950


Botulinum Toxin Injections
Botulinum toxin is used in the treatment of
many spastic conditions, movement, and
autonomic disorders such as Cervical
Dystonia.
Cervical Dystonia
Muscle spasms in multiple neck muscles
with twisting or tilting of the head along
with decreased range of motion in the neck
lasting more than 6 months.
Botulinum toxin injections may be repeated
in 3 months
Patient monitoring
You will be required to stay at the clinic for
up to 30 minutes following your injection, to
allow monitoring for any possible side
effects.
Home Care after Botulinum Toxin
Injection
Some patients may have weakness in their
neck or arms after treatment.
You may feel sore at the injection site for
the next 2-4 days. For the first 24 hours, you
may apply ice if needed, to the site for 20
minutes on and 20 minutes off to decrease
pain and discomfort. After 24 hours, you
may use heat if needed.
Your pain may subside right away, or it may
take several days. There may be a time when
you feel like you have more pain. This is
called a pain flare. If this happens, limit your
activities for the first 24 hours and do things
that don’t cause pain. Keep taking your pain
medicine as prescribed.
ξ You may return to your normal
routine as soon as you are able.
ξ Most often, patients do not have any
problems after treatment.
ξ There is a slight risk of infection or
bleeding at the injection site.
ξ Neck or shoulder pain
When and How to Contact the Clinic
Signs of infection
ξ Fever greater than 100.4° F by
mouth for 2 readings taken 4 hours
apart.
ξ Increased redness, swelling around
the site.
ξ Any drainage from the site.

Please call: (608) 265-3207
After hours, nights and weekends, call:
(608)-262-2122 or, if you live out of the
area, call: (800) 323-8942, ask for the
rehabilitation doctor on call. Leave your
name and phone number with the area code.
The doctor will call you back.


Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 1/2017 University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing HF#7950.