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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,OB, GYN, Womens Health, Infertility

How to Choose a Doctor for Your Baby (7018)

How to Choose a Doctor for Your Baby (7018) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, OB, GYN, Womens Health, Infertility

7018




How to Choose a Doctor for Your Baby


Who can treat or care for babies?

ξ Pediatrician- a person trained in
childhood illnesses and normal
growth and development.
ξ Family practitioner- a doctor who
treats patients of all ages and can
treat anyone in the family.
ξ Nurse practitioner- a person trained
in graduate school to provide care for
common childhood illnesses. They
are also trained in normal growth and
development.


Here is a list of suggestions about how to
choose a health care provider for your
child.

 Ask your insurer for a list of
approved providers.
 Call your local hospital or clinic for
a list of providers accepting new
patients.
 Ask family and friends for
references.
 Review information about providers
on-line.
 You can set up a consultation before
your baby is born. Check to see if
there is a fee for this visit.

If you set up a consultation here are some
questions and tips for that visit.

 Where did you do your training?
 How long have you been in practice?
 Do you practice by yourself or with a
group?
 With which hospitals are you
affiliated?
 What insurance plans do you accept?
 What are your office hours? Who do
I call after hours?
 What is your office policy about
phone calls? For example, if I call
with a medical question how will my
call be handled and by whom?
 How do you and your office handle
emergencies?
 What happens when you are not
available or not on call?
 What is the average waiting time for
an appointment?
 What are your views on breast and
bottle feeding?
 Do you have a lactation consultant
on staff? How do I access that
person as a new mother?
 Are there separate well baby and sick
baby areas in your waiting room?
 Tell me about your staff and their
credentials.
 Does your office offer any special
services or classes for new patients?
 Come early and sit in the waiting
room to check out the atmosphere.
Watch how the staff relates to the
patients.


Here is a list of questions to ask yourself
after the consultation.

 Would I be able to ask this person
any question, no matter how silly it
might seem?
 Did I feel comfortable talking with
this person and the office staff?
 Is the staff friendly and efficient?


 Is the office easy to get to? Is the
staff easy to reach in case of
emergency?
 Is the office friendly to children and
adults?
 Does this care provider share my
philosophy of parenting?




























Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor.
This is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because
each person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team
when using this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 7/2016 University of
Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#7018