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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,OB, GYN, Womens Health, Infertility

Home Care after Laser Surgery (5773)

Home Care after Laser Surgery (5773) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, OB, GYN, Womens Health, Infertility

5773



Home Care after Laser Surgery


Laser surgery uses a laser light source to
remove diseased tissues. This handout tells
you how to care for yourself after laser
treatment. If you have any questions or
concerns after you go home, please call the
numbers listed at the end of the handout.

Cervix and Vagina
 It is normal to have some reddish,
watery discharge during the first ten
days after treatment. You may use pads,
but do not use tampons.
 Do not put anything into the vagina
(birth canal) for three full weeks. Do not
douche.
 Do not have sex for four weeks or until
ok with your doctor. Check with your
doctor if you have questions.
 You may have a few cramps like
menstrual cramps. This is normal and
may be relieved by medicine such as
Tylenol® or ibuprofen.

Vulva and Anus
 Do not wear slacks, jeans, or tight
clothes. A dress or loose pants is
preferred.
 Do not wear nylon or synthetic
underwear or pantyhose. Use white
cotton panties when you go out or wear
no underwear around the house.
 Use the “peri bottle” given to you by
your nurse to rinse off after you urinate
or have a bowel movement. Pat yourself
dry gently. Do not rub, as this will
increase your discomfort.
 Use pain medicines as advised. Most
people find they need it most during the
first week. If you are taking opioid pain
medicine, take a stool softener (Colace )
daily. Drink plenty of fluids and eat
high fiber foods to help avoid
constipation.
 You may have been given a numbing gel
(Lidocaine jelly 2%). Put this around
the anus and on the vulvar area to
decrease pain during bowel movements.
You may also wish to put this on your
labia if urine causes burning.
 Sit in a bathtub twice a day, letting warm
water wash over the genital area. Do not
use soap on the genital area. If you do
not have a bathtub, a sitz bath will be
given to you.
 After your bath, use a hair dryer (on low
heat) or a fan to dry the perineal area.
When using a hair dryer, put one foot up
on a chair to expose the area as you blow
it dry. Do not rub with a towel.
 It often requires 4 weeks to heal.

When to Call
 If you have severe cramping or pain not
relieved by pain medicine.
 If you have bright red bleeding or the
amount of drainage is more than one
pad in an hour.
 If your vaginal drainage becomes foul-
smelling, cloudy, thick, or greenish in
color, you may have an infection.
 If you have a fever greater than 100.4ºF
by mouth, for 2 readings taken 4 hours
apart.
 If you can not have a bowel movement
within 2-3 days.



Phone Numbers
If you have any questions or problems once you are home, please call your doctor or nurse.

UW Health- Managed OB Clinics
UW Health West
OB/GYN Clinic
451 Junction Rd
Madison WI 53717
(608) 265-7601
UW Health East
OB/GYN Clinic
5249 E Terrace Pkwy
Madison WI 53718
(608) 265-1230

UW Health Benign
Gynecology Clinic
600 Highland Ave
Madison WI 53792
(608) 263-6240

UW Health
Gynecology/Oncology
Clinic
600 Highland Ave
Madison WI 53792
(608) 263-1548

UWMF- Managed OB Clinics
OB/GYN Clinic
20 S. Park, Suite 307
Madison, WI 53715
(608) 287-2830

East Towne
4122 East Towne
Blvd.
Madison, WI 53704
(608) 242-6840
West Towne
7102 Mineral Point Rd.
Madison, WI 53717
(608) 828-7610
Fitchburg
5543 East Cheryl
Parkway
Fitchburg, WI 53711
(608) 274-5300
UW Arboretum OB/GYN Clinic
1102 S. Park Street
Madison, WI 53715
(608) 287-5898



















Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright 7/2016. University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#5773