/clinical/,/clinical/pted/,/clinical/pted/hffy/,/clinical/pted/hffy/nutrition/,

/clinical/pted/hffy/nutrition/456.hffy

20170496

page

100

UWHC,UWMF,

Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Nutrition

Consistency: Advanced Soft Consistency Diet (456)

Consistency: Advanced Soft Consistency Diet (456) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Nutrition

456






Advanced Soft Consistency Diet
(Comparable to National Dysphagia Diet Level 3)

What is the Advanced Consistency Diet?
Your doctor wants you to follow this diet because of dysphagia or another medical condition.
Dysphagia means a person has difficulties swallowing. This can happen for a variety of reasons,
but often times it is the result of a stroke, injury, or disease. In this diet, foods need to be moist
and should be in “bite-size” pieces. You will need to avoid foods that are very hard, sticky, or
crunchy.

Why is this diet safer for me?
Foods in this diet are easier to chew. It is the next step in moving towards eating a regular diet.

Food
Groups
Safe Foods Foods to Avoid Thin liquids
(if allowed)
Milk
Products
 Smooth or fruit yogurt
 Cottage cheese
 Sliced or cubed cheese
 Plain cream cheese
Cream cheese with
nuts or pineapple

Meat and
Protein
 Tender thin sliced, diced, or
ground meats or poultry
 Moist fish
 Shell fish
 Eggs
 Creamy peanut butter
 Casseroles
Tough dry meat or
poultry, dry fish,
chunky peanut butter,
nuts

Vegetables  All tender cooked vegetables
 Cream corn
 Legumes
 Shredded lettuce
Raw veggies, non-
tender or rubbery
cooked veggies,
whole kernel corn,
potato skins

Fruits  All canned and cooked fruits
 Soft-ripe, peeled fresh peaches,
nectarines, kiwi, cantaloupe,
honeydew, and watermelon
(without seeds)
 Berries
Fresh apples and
pears, pineapple,
grapes, dried fruit,
fruit leather, fruit
roll-ups, fruit snacks.
Watermelon if on
thick liquids
Fruit juice
Breads,
Cereals,
Starches
 Bread, biscuits, muffins,
pancakes, French toast, waffles
 Any moistened cereal
 Rice or wild rice
Granola or other
cereals with nuts and
dried fruit, crackers,
potato skins, bagels






Food
Groups
Safe Foods Foods to Avoid Thin liquids
(if allowed)
Soup  Any soup except those on avoid
list
 Corn or clam chowder that has
been through a blender
Chunks of meat that
are bigger than 1
inch, corn and clam
chowder
Broth and
bouillon
Desserts  All desserts except those on avoid
list
Desserts with nuts,
seeds, coconut,
pineapple, sticky
caramels, or dried
fruit
Malts, milk
shakes, sherbet,
frozen yogurts,
ice cream, gelatin,
eggnog,
nutritional
supplements
Drinks  Any drink that is a safe liquid
thickness for you.

Tip: Drinks may need to be thickened.
Milk, Juice,
coffee, tea, soda,
carbonated
drinks, alcoholic
drinks, nutritional
supplements, ice
chips
Other  Butter or margarine
 Salad dressings, mayonnaise,
vinegar and oils
 Gravies
 Seasonings, herbs, and spices
 Catsup, mustard
 Honey
 Jelly, jam, and preserves
 Sugar, syrup, or molasses
 Horseradish, chili sauce, or salsa
Olives, candy with
nuts, seeds or
coconuts, caramels
or other sticky
chewy candy



What is an example of a meal on the advanced consistency diet?
A meal on the dysphagia advanced diet, might include: thinly sliced deli turkey, cheddar cheese,
honey mustard and shredded lettuce on sliced wheat bread. As a side dish, you may choose
tender cooked green beans with balsamic vinaigrette dressing. For dessert, you might eat fresh
ripe strawberries.





















Adapted from the American Dietetic Association Nutrition Care Manual: National Dysphagia
Diet Task Force. National Dysphagia Diet – Standardization for Optimal Care. Chicago, Ill:
American Dietetic Association; 2002:10-12.



Teach Back:
What is the most important thing you learned from this handout?
What changes will you make in your diet/lifestyle, based on what you learned today?






















If you have more questions please contact UW Health at one of the phone number listed below.
You can also visit our website at www.uwhealth.org/nutrition

Nutrition clinics for UW Hospital and Clinics (UWHC) and American Family Children’s
Hospital (AFCH) can be reached at: (608) 890-5500.

Nutrition clinics for UW Medical Foundation (UWMF) can be reached at: (608) 287-2770.


Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 5/2016 University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Clinical Nutrition Services Department and the Department
of Nursing. HF#456