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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Neuro, Rehab

After a Spinal Cord Injury: Braces (7584)

After a Spinal Cord Injury: Braces (7584) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Neuro, Rehab

7584


After a Spinal Cord Injury: Braces


Halo Brace
This brace is a metal ring which goes around your head. It is attached
to the skull with four screws. You will be placed in a sheepskin-lined
vest. You must remain in the halo brace until the injury is healed, about
8-12 weeks. Sometimes, both surgery and a halo brace are needed.
Some patients are able to sit up, walk or begin rehabilitation while
wearing a halo brace.

For more information, ask your nurse for HFFY#5398.




Cervical Collar
A cervical collar is a rigid collar that goes around the
neck and prevents movement. It has front and back
pieces which are held together by Velcro®. You may
need surgery before you can use this collar. You will
remain in the collar all of the time until the injury has
healed, about 8-12 weeks.

For more information, ask your nurse for
HFFY #5409.




Minerva Brace
This brace is a rigid collar that goes around your neck. It attaches to
a lined vest. This brace is not attached to your skull. You may have
surgery before you are given this brace. You must wear it all of the
time until your injury has healed, about 8-12 weeks.


For more information, ask your nurse for HFFY #5409.






TSLO Brace
This rigid brace is lined with foam and has a plastic shell. It
has front and back pieces which are held together by
Velcro®. A TSLO brace will prevent you from bending at
the waist or twisting your back. The staff will let you know
when it must be worn. Some need to wear it when out of
bed. Others need to wear it at all times. Your doctor will let
you know when you no longer need to wear it.


For more information, ask your nurse for HFFY #5390.































Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 11/2016 University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing HF#7584.