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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Geriatrics

Sleep and Rest in the Hospital (7361)

Sleep and Rest in the Hospital (7361) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Geriatrics

7361



Sleep and Rest in the Hospital

Getting enough sleep and rest can be a
problem when you are in the hospital.
This handout will give you some tips to
help you get better sleep.

Reasons for Sleep
ξ Sleep restores energy and helps
the body heal.
ξ Sleep can lower stress and
improve coping.
ξ Sleep can lower confusion,
irritability, and restlessness.
ξ Lack of sleep can lead to a weak
immune system. This makes it
harder to fight infection.
ξ Lack of sleep can lower your
pain tolerance.

Tips to Help You Sleep
ξ Let your nurse know about your
sleeping habits. Some people use
a night light or have a sleeping
position that is most comfortable.
Others need to adjust the room
temperature.
ξ Let staff know if you prefer to
have the door shut or the lights
turned off.
ξ Use ear plugs or a black-out
mask.
ξ Play quiet music. (TV Channel
#10 has calming music.)
ξ Use white noise, like from a fan,
to cover hospital sounds.
ξ Try to stay awake during the day
to keep a normal sleeping
schedule.
ξ Discuss your activity orders with
your nurse. Get out of bed during
the day to a chair and take walks.
ξ Ask that your family and friends
leave before bedtime and to not
visit while you are sleeping.
ξ Review your care plan with your
nurse to find times to sleep when
you won’t be interrupted.

If you have tried these tips and still have
trouble getting enough sleep, talk to your
nurse or doctor to figure out what is
keeping you awake.











Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and
call if you have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check
with your doctor. This is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any
medical condition. Because each person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor
or others on your health care team when using this information. If you have an emergency, please call
911. Copyright ©8/2016. University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved.
Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#7361.