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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Genitourinary

Ileal Loop/Conduit Urinary Diversion (7863)

Ileal Loop/Conduit Urinary Diversion (7863) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Genitourinary

7863








Ileal Loop/Conduit
Urinary Diversion

Urology Clinic: 608-263-4757
Toll Free: 1-800-323-8942



Table of Contents
The Urinary Tract ................................................................................................... 1
What is a Radical Cystectomy? ......................................................................... 2
How do I get rid of urine after the bladder is removed? ...................... 2
What is an Ileal Conduit? .................................................................................... 2
What is a stoma? ..................................................................................................... 2
Getting Ready for Surgery-Emptying Your Bowel................................... 3
What to Expect After Surgery ........................................................................... 3
Abdominal drains ............................................................................................... 3
Stoma Tube ........................................................................................................ 3
Stents .................................................................................................................... 3
JP drain................................................................................................................. 3
Foley Catheter ................................................................................................... 3
Incision ................................................................................................................ 4
Nasogastric Tube (NG tube) ....................................................................... 4
Pain Control ....................................................................................................... 4
Walking ................................................................................................................ 4
Home Care ................................................................................................................. 5
Incision Care ......................................................................................................... 5
Stoma Care ............................................................................................................. 5
Stoma Tube and Stents ..................................................................................... 5
Urostomy Bag ....................................................................................................... 5



Changing your Ostomy Appliance ............................................................... 6
Discharge Urostomy Supplies ....................................................................... 7
How to Drain Urostomy Appliance ............................................................. 8
How Attach Large Urine Drainage Bag ..................................................... 8
Diet ............................................................................................................................ 9
Activity ..................................................................................................................... 9
Clothes .................................................................................................................. 10
Travel .................................................................................................................... 10
Follow-up ................................................................................................................ 10
Troubleshooting Problems ............................................................................. 10
Leaking: ................................................................................................................ 10
Dark Urine: ......................................................................................................... 11
Mucus in the Urine: ......................................................................................... 11
Bloody Urine: ..................................................................................................... 11
MEDICALERT Identification ........................................................................... 12
When to Call the Doctor: .................................................................................. 12
Phone Numbers: .................................................................................................. 13


1

This booklet is a resource for you. It will help you learn more
about the urinary diversion procedure, how to care for yourself
after surgery, and any problems you may have after surgery. Each
patient is different. Your care may vary from the information
given here. This Health Facts For You is a general guideline and
may vary in how tubes are managed. Instructions may be
modified or changed at the discretion of the surgeon. Call the
urology clinic with any questions.
The Urinary Tract
The urinary tract is made up of 2 kidneys, 2 ureters, a bladder, and
a urethra. The kidneys are towards your back at waist level. The
kidneys filter blood and make urine. Each kidney has a ureter or
tube that carries urine to the bladder. The bladder stores urine,
then it is passed from your body through the urethra.












2

What is a Radical Cystectomy?
This is a surgery to remove the bladder. The prostate gland is also
removed in men. The uterus is also removed in women.
How do I get rid of urine after the bladder is removed?
After the bladder is removed, a urinary diversion is made using a
piece of your bowel. This can be done in different ways depending
on your medical history, age, lifestyle, and how able you are to
care for yourself after surgery.
What is an Ileal Conduit?
Using part of your bowel as a loop/conduit, the ureters (two tubes
that carry urine from the kidneys) are attached so that they empty
through this loop. The other end of the loop is then brought out
through the abdominal wall and a stoma is created. You will need
to wear a bag over your stoma to collect urine all the time.
What is a stoma?
The stoma is the end part of the conduit brought to the outside of
the abdomen. There is no feeling in your stoma. The stoma will
shrink during the first two
months. The stitches around it
will fall out by themselves. It is
important to keep the skin
around your stoma healthy.






3

Getting Ready for Surgery-Emptying Your Bowel
You will need to empty the stool from your bowel before surgery.
The nurse will go over these steps with you as ordered by your
surgeon.
What to Expect After Surgery
Back in your hospital room, you will have tubes, drains and other
equipment. An IV (intravenous) line for giving fluids and medicine.
Abdominal drains
Stoma Tube
This tube goes through your stoma into your conduit. It helps
drain urine from the conduit into your urostomy pouch and hold
the stoma open. If it falls out this is ok.
Stents
These are 2 small tubes that go into your conduit through the
stoma and up the ureters into your kidneys. Stents drain the urine
from the conduit while the conduit is healing. You will go home
with the stents in place. Call the clinic if these fall out. They are
taken out at your 1st follow up visit.
JP drain
This soft rubber drain is near your incision and comes out through
the skin. It drains fluid from around your conduit. This helps
prevent infection and speeds healing.
Foley Catheter
A tube placed in your urethra to drain excess fluid from where
your bladder was located.



4

Incision
Your incision will be from upper abdomen to pubic area and held
together with small staples. The staples allow the skin to heal
with the least amount of scarring. There may be drainage from
the incision. It will be cleaned and a dressing will be applied daily.
Nasogastric Tube (NG tube)
NG tube goes through your nose into your stomach. It drains your
stomach. This is to help your bowel rest as it heals. This is placed
while you are in surgery and stays in 3-5 days. It will be
removed once you begin to pass gas.
Pain Control
Use your pain medicine to keep your pain rating mild so that you
can move around.
Walking
Moving and walking are the
best way to speed your
recovery. You will be walking
the day after surgery. The
nurses will help you until you
are steady on your feet.
Walking helps the return of
bowel function. It can also
help prevent pneumonia and
blood clots.




5

Home Care
Expect to be in the hospital 7-10 days. The nursing staff will teach
you and your primary support person how to care for your stoma,
urostomy, and tubes.
Incision Care
Wash your incision gently with soap and water once a day and pat
dry
Stoma Care
You may gently wipe off mucus buildup with plain warm water
once a day if needed. Be very careful around sutures. The stoma
may bleed when cleaned. This is normal. The amount of bleeding
should be small and will stop on its own. Once healed, stomas may
be uncovered during a shower, but should never be scrubbed and
only patted gently with a soft towel.
Go to the nearest emergency room if soma turns dark color
(dusky blue, grey, brown, or black) or if stoma is bleeding.
Stoma Tube and Stents
Take care to hold these in place when changing the urostomy tube
bag. If the stents fall out, please call the clinic. If the stoma tube
falls out, this is ok
Urostomy Bag
The pouch system prevents urine from touching the skin or
leaking out. These bags drain from the bottom and can attach to a
larger bag for over night use

6

Changing your Ostomy Appliance
Change pouch system every 3-4 days or more often if needed. The
supplies you will need:
Wafer/barrier _________
Adhesive remover __________
Pouch ____________
Skin prep ___________
Bedside urine bag ________________
Urine bag connectors ________________
1. Prepare wafer/barrier: mold starter hold to stoma size/shape
2. Place towel or pad under urostomy pouch and begin to remove
old wafer/barrier and pouch with adhesive remover
3. Clean skin around stoma with luke-warm tap water. Dry.
4. Apply skin protectant on skin around stoma. Allow to dry. If
skin is irritated, red, or raw, apply stomahesive Powder on the
irritated skin only, dust off excess, blot with skin protectant on
powdered areas. Repeat if needed. Allow to dry. Use more skin
protectant to protect intact skin around stoma.
5. Apply molded wafer/barrier around stoma. Right away you
will gently rub wafer/barrier area around stoma. Remove backing
from white adhesive and smooth onto skin.
6. Attach urostomy pouch to accordion ring or wafer/barrier.
7. Ensure that pouch is closed. Empty when 1/3 full.



7

Discharge Urostomy Supplies
Most of the time, urostomy supplies are covered by your
insurance. If you have Medicare, it will pay 80% of the cost. If you
also have a supplemental insurance plan, it will often cover the
other 20%. Many private insurance plans or HMO’s will pay the
full cost of the supplies as long as they have been prescribed by a
doctor. Your prescription will need to be renewed every 90 days
to have supply costs covered. After six months you may call your
primary care doctor for a refill.
We will provide you with a small number of supplies when you go
home. Most patients are set up for home health visits at discharge.
If you have Medicare, the home health service will provide you
with more supplies. Once you have been discharged from home
health, call us at 608-263-4757 and leave a message for the
urostomy nurse with the name of your preferred provider. We
will fax the prescription to them. They may mail them to you or
you may need to pick them up. Your provider may set a regular
schedule to deliver your supplies. Others want you to call when
you need more. They will need a copy of your prescription.
If you do not have Medicare, you will be discharged home with
enough supplies until your first clinic visit. At that time you will
receive a prescription for more urostomy supplies. We can fax
this to your provider or you may take it with you.
Do not order too many supplies at one time before your first clinic
visit. Most stomas shrink. You will likely need a new prescription
with your new wafer/barrier at that clinic visit.


8

How to Drain Urostomy Appliance
1. Wash hands with warm water and soap for at least 15
seconds. Rinse. Dry thoroughly with a clean towel.
2. Make sure flap at bottom of pouch is NOT flipped to a red
drop.
3. Open cap at end
4. Stand over toilet.
5. Turn flap at bottom of pouch so red drop IS showing.
6. Allow urine to flow into toilet.
7. Wipe the end of the bag dry.
8. Turn flap so red is NOT showing.
9. Replace cap.
How Attach Large Urine Drainage Bag
At bedtime you will want to attach the larger urine drainage to
hold more urine at a time
1. Wash your hands with warm water and soap for at least 15
seconds. Rinse. Dry with a clean towel.
2. Make sure the flap at the bottom of the urostomy pouch is
NOT showing a red drop.
3. Make sure the urostomy connector is attached to the large
urine drainage bag.
4. Attach the connector with drainage bag to the bottom of the
urostomy pouch.
5. Switch the flap on the end of the urostomy pouch to red drop.
6. Place the large strap on your leg at a comfortable spot. Do
not put the straps so tight that they leave a mark on your leg.
These may have to adjust once you stand.
7. The bag should be kept lower than your kidneys which are at
the level of the bottom of your rib cage.
8. After you take off the bag you will rinse with a mixture of ½
cup white vinegar and ½ cup tap water using the syringe

9

provided. Drain. Rinse with clear water using the syringe.
Allow the bag to air dry.
Diet
Eat a soft general diet until your follow-up visit. Some foods may
change the odor of your urine. Foods such as eggs, fish, asparagus,
spicy foods, and vitamins often change the odor of your urine.
Drink at least 8-12 (8oz) glasses of liquid a day.
Activity
Return to your normal routine as you are able. Walking is a great
way to get your strength back. After 2 months most people can
return to the things they enjoyed before surgery.
You may shower or take a sponge bath. Do not soak in a bath, hot
tub, or swim until your incision is healed. Check with your doctor.
It’s best to shower on the day that your urostomy pouch needs
to be changed. On other days, you can cover your urostomy pouch
with a plastic bag. Once you learn how to best get your urostomy
pouch to stay, you can shower without covering your urostomy.
Always empty your pouch before any activity in which trauma
to the pouch area may occur.
Do not lift more than 10 pounds for 6 weeks.
Nothing more strenuous than walking. No contact sports such as
football, basketball or racquetball until your doctor says it is ok.
Do not drive for 4 weeks or while taking narcotic pain pills.
You may resume sexual activity when you are ready. Some people
worry about being accepted by their partner. Talk about your
feelings. Your loved one may be afraid they may hurt you. You
need to let them know that sex will not harm the stoma.


10

Clothes
Wear loose fitting clothing at first. Do not wear belts or
waistbands over the stoma that could rub it and cause it to bleed.
Travel
Travel as much as you like. Always bring all your supplies with
you. They may be kept in a zip-lock bag or other clean container.
You may want to keep an extra urostomy change at work. When
flying, carry your supplies in a carry-on bag in case your luggage is
lost.
In the event of a problem, know the names of a doctor, clinic and
supply store in the area where you will travel.
Follow-up
You will have follow-up visits with your urology doctor. Be sure
to keep a list of problems, questions, or concern so we can discuss
them.
Troubleshooting Problems
You will need time to adjust to the change in how your body
works. It will take many weeks to months before you have a
routine. These tips may help.
Leaking:
Make sure the area around the stoma is dry before you place the
new pouch on.
Empty your pouch when it is 1/3 full, so it doesn’t pull on the
pouch system.
When applying the wafer/barrier, make sure you are pressing
down around the stoma on the form-fitting portion.

11

Remain lying down immediately after applying a new urostomy
pouch for 30 minutes.
If you are still having issues with leaking, please contact the
urology clinic.
Dark Urine:
Add more non-caffeinated fluids to your diet.
Mucus in the Urine:
This is normal, since your conduit is made out of bowel. Try
drinking more non-caffeinated fluids if the mucus gets too thick.
You may gently remove mucus from the stoma when changing
your ostomy pouch.
Bloody Urine:
Flecks of blood in the urine or on the stoma are normal. The
stoma can get irritated. If your urine is pink or red, you may have
an infection. Call the urology clinic.


12

MEDICALERT Identification
You should wear a MEDICALERT ID that says
Ileal/Colon Conduit Urinary Diversion
Size _______
Pharmacies have the forms for the MedicAlert ID or you may
write, call or find them on the web.
Medic Alert Foundation International
2323 Colorado Avenue
Turlock, CA 95382
www.medicalert.org
Phone: 888-633-4298 or 209-668-3333
Fax: 209-669-2450
When to Call the Doctor:
ξ No urine output
ξ Urine is thick, cloudy, or foul smelling
ξ bloody urine
ξ chills or a temperature greater than 100.4 F for 2 readings
taken 4 hours apart
ξ nausea and vomiting
ξ abdominal or flank pain
ξ pain you cannot control with your pain pills


13

Phone Numbers:
Urology Clinic: (608) 263-4757
After hours, weekends, and holidays this connects you to the
message center. Ask for the urology doctor on call. Leave your
name and phone number with the area code. The doctor will call
you back.
If you live outside the area: 1-800-323-8942














Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor.
This is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because
each person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team
when using this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright ©5/2016. University of
Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#7863.