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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Diabetes, Endocrine

Insulin Pump Requirements (7948)

Insulin Pump Requirements (7948) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Diabetes, Endocrine

7948


Insulin Pump Requirements
If you or your family member is thinking
about using an insulin pump, it is helpful to
know what is required first. This handout
includes a list for you to review and discuss
with your health care team.
A pump can help people to better manage
blood sugar levels, but success will depend
on a number of things. The list below will
help you realize the effort required in order
to use a pump safely. You will need to work
with your health care team and insurance
company to help decide if you are ready for
a pump. Your health insurance company
may have other rules for using a pump.

Before a Pump Is Prescribed
References
Jayasekara, R., Munn, Z., & Lockwood, C. (2011). Effect of educational components and strategies
associated with insulin pump therapy: A systematic review. International Journal of Evidence-based
Healthcare, 9(4): 346-361.


Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright ©12/2016. University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#7948.

Requirements Questions/Comments
 Must be under the care of a provider
specializing in diabetes

 Must be working with both a nurse and dietitian
who are diabetes educators

 Must have had diabetes for at least six months
 Must be on 3 or more insulin injections a day
 Must be checking blood sugar 4 times a day
(before meals and bedtime)

 Must want to improve blood sugar control
 Must attend all clinic visits
 Must be willing to communicate with diabetes
staff between clinic visits

 Must show you can count carbohydrates
 Must be able to describe sick day plan
 Medicare Only: requires proof that you do not
make enough insulin to control your blood
sugars. This means you will need lab work
done, including a fasting glucose and C-peptide.