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Driving Expectations for Patients on Continuous Inotropic Infusions - Milrinone, Dobutamine and Others (7234)

Driving Expectations for Patients on Continuous Inotropic Infusions - Milrinone, Dobutamine and Others (7234) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Cardiology, Cardiovascular Surgery

7234




Driving-What to Expect for Patients on Continuous Inotropic Infusions
Milrinone, Dobutamine and others

Patients may drive if :
ξ They have a working
defibrillator in place.
ξ They have been on stable
inotropic infusion for at least 3
months and the defibrillator
check shows no symptoms that
can cause altered
consciousness. This means no
lightheadedness, defibrillator
shocks, or arrhythmias.
ξ A heart failure doctor has
decided they are stable and can
be allowed to drive.
ξ They have a 4-wheel enclosed
private vehicle to drive.

Patients who are given permission to
drive cannot drive the vehicles listed
below. This is not a complete list.
Any questions should be discussed
with a heart failure doctor.
ξ Commercial vehicles – taxi
cabs, semi trucks, buses, etc.
ξ All terrain vehicles,
motorcycles, etc.

Patients need to get permission from a
heart failure doctor if they want to
drive more than 2 hours away from
their homes.

A heart failure doctor will decide
when a patient may return to driving:
ξ If there is a change in the
patient’s medical condition.
ξ If the patient has been in the
hospital.

If these guidelines are not followed,
we have the right to report the patient
to their state’s Department of
Transportation.



Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor.
This is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because
each person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team
when using this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 5/2017 University of
Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#7234