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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Cancer, BMT, Hematology

Scalp Cooling to Reduce or Prevent Hair Loss During Chemotherapy (8012)

Scalp Cooling to Reduce or Prevent Hair Loss During Chemotherapy (8012) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Cancer, BMT, Hematology

8012

Scalp Cooling to Reduce or Prevent Hair Loss during Chemotherapy

Scalp Cooling Caps
One of the difficult side effects of
chemotherapy is hair loss. Cooling caps are
silicone caps cooled to a very low
temperature. They are also called scalp
hypothermia. They are worn before, during
and after a chemotherapy treatment. This
helps reduce or prevent hair loss.
The Paxman Scalp Cooling system is
available at the UW Carbone Cancer Clinics
in Madison, Wisconsin. If you wish to use
the system, please review scalp cooling
information at www.paxmanusa.com. Your
oncologist will need to prescribe scalp
cooling. You will then work directly with
The Paxman Hub. You will send payment to
Paxman. Insurance generally does not cover
the cost of scalp cooling.
Frequently Asked Questions
Who can use a cooling cap?
Cooling caps are used in patients who have
solid tumor cancers. They are used with
certain chemotherapy drugs. They are most
helpful when used in patients receiving
taxane chemotherapy. But success does
vary. Overall, about half of patients feel they
help. They report they do not need to wear a
wig or head cover.

Cooling caps cannot be used in patients with
hematological malignancies (leukemia).
They cannot be used in patients who cannot
stand very cold temperatures. Please discuss
your condition with an oncologist. Together
you can decide if scalp cooling is an option.

How does a cooling cap work?
Hair cells are the second fastest dividing
cells in the body. Cancer cells are also fast
dividing cells. Chemotherapy drugs work on
fast dividing cells like those in cancers. But
they can also affect your hair cells. This can
cause hair loss 2-3 weeks after your first
treatment. Cooling caps reduce the blood
flow to your hair follicles. This limits or
prevents hair loss.

How do you use a cooling cap?
You wear the cooling cap before, during,
and for a time after a chemotherapy
treatment. The caps come in a variety of
sizes. Caps are attached to a machine that
circulates cold fluid through the cap.
How do I get scalp cooling with my
chemotherapy infusions?
Your oncologist writes a prescription for
scalp cooling. It gets sent to Paxman Scalp
Cooling. Staff at your oncologist's office
work with you to schedule the scalp cooling
equipment. This will ensure it is ready for
use with your chemotherapy infusions. Visit
the Paxman Hub online to learn more about
the process. Contact Paxman to send
payment. Details about the process and the
cost are available on the Paxman Hub.





For more information, contact your
oncologist’s office:
ξ UW Carbone Cancer Clinic within
University Hospital
(608) 265-1700
ξ UW Carbone Cancer Clinic within
One South Park Street Clinic
(608) 287-2552
ξ UW Health Breast Center within
University Hospital
(608) 266-6400

























Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 10/2017 University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing HF#8012