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Clinical Hub,Patient Education,Health and Nutrition Facts For You,Cancer, BMT, Hematology

Oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) For the Treatment of Cancer (5620)

Oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) For the Treatment of Cancer (5620) - Clinical Hub, Patient Education, Health and Nutrition Facts For You, Cancer, BMT, Hematology

5620






Oxaliplatin
(Eloxatin)
For the Treatment of Cancer


Description
It is chemotherapy given for the treatment of cancer.

How It Is Given
It is given over 2 hours through a vein or central catheter (IV).

Common Side Effects
 Nausea and vomiting and poor appetite.
 Feeling tired.
 Diarrhea.
 Decreased blood count.
 If given through a vein in the arm, a sensation of numbness and tingling may occur during
infusion at and above the site of the infusion
 Trouble breathing or swallowing and/or mouth, throat, or lip numbness. This occurs
when the areas are exposed to cold air, food or liquid. This is most likely to happen
during or up to 5 days after the drug is given. AVOID DRINKING or EATING COLD
FOODS, USE MITTENS and SCARVES IN THE WINTER. WEAR AN OVEN MITT
WHEN REACHING INTO THE FREEZER.

Call Your Health Care Provider if You Develop
 Trouble walking
 Trouble swallowing
 Nausea and vomiting uncontrolled by medicine
 Fever greater than 100.8 θ F

Special Concerns
 Avoid drinking or eating cold liquids or foods the day of treatment and for up to one week
after getting the drug.
 Place a scarf or mask over your nose and mouth during cold weather to prevent cold air
exposure to the mouth or throat.
 Wear gloves/mittens when reaching into freezer or refrigerator for up to 1 week or until cold
sensitivity goes away.



Your health care team may have given you this information as part of your care. If so, please use it and call if you
have any questions. If this information was not given to you as part of your care, please check with your doctor. This
is not medical advice. This is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Because each
person’s health needs are different, you should talk with your doctor or others on your health care team when using
this information. If you have an emergency, please call 911. Copyright © 4/2017. University of Wisconsin Hospitals
and Clinics Authority. All rights reserved. Produced by the Department of Nursing. HF#5620