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Facilitating Client Centered Learning Guideline at a Glance (Nursing Practice Guideline)

Facilitating Client Centered Learning Guideline at a Glance (Nursing Practice Guideline) - Clinical Hub, UW Health Clinical Tool Search, UW Health Clinical Tool Search, Clinical Practice Guidelines, Nursing Practice Guidelines


Copyright © 201� University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority
Contact: Last Revised: 02/2015EArsenaultknudsen@uwhealth.org
1
Guideline Title: Facilitating Client Centred Learning
Effective Date: February, 2015
Approved By: Nursing Practice Guidelines Committee; Nursing Practice Council
I. Guideline Overview
This content is extracted from the adopted source document: Registered Nurses’ Association of
Ontario. (2012). Facilitating Client Centred Learning. Toronto, Canada: Registered Nurses’
Association of Ontario. Please refer to the source guideline for complete information.
Target Population:
Adults over the age of 18. The needs of children and youth, related to developmental stages and
learning, is beyond the scope of this guideline. Specific strategies to facilitate learning in special
populations and accommodation to disabilities are also beyond the scope of this guideline.
Nursing Practice Guideline Objectives
The aim of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for Registered
Nurses, Registered Practical Nurses and other health-care providers to facilitate client centred
learning that promotes and enables clients to take action for their health.
Clinical Questions Considered
1. How can nurses effectively facilitate client centred learning?
2. What are effective teaching delivery methods/strategies for client centred learning?
3. How do nurses assess client learning?
II. Practice Recommendations
RNAO
Recommendati
on Number
RNAO Recommendation
(see full guideline for complete list of recommendations)
Type of
Evidence
Practice Recommendations
2
Use a universal precautions approach for health literacy to
create a safe, shame- and blame-free environment.
Ib
3 Assess the learning needs of the client. Ia
4
Tailor your approach and educational design by collaborating
with the client and the interprofessional team.
Ia
5
Engage in more structured and intentional approaches when
facilitating client centred learning.
Ia
6
Use plain language, pictures and illustrations to promote health
literacy.
Ia
University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics
Nursing Practice Guideline At-a-Glance

Copyright © 201� University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority
Contact: Last Revised: 02/2015EArsenaultknudsen@uwhealth.org
2
7
Use a combination of educational strategies for effective
learning.
Ia
8 Assess client learning. IIa
9
Communicate client centred learning effectively with:
a. The client; and
b. The interprofessional team
Ib
Education Recommendations
14
Develop documentation tools to support effective
communication of client centred learning
IV
III. Pertinent Resources
A. Policies
• Policy 1.19 Scope of Service and Nursing Care
• Policy 7.35 Health Facts for You
• Policy 8.02 Assessment and Reassessment of Patients and Documentation in Clinics
• Policy 14.21 Patient and Family Education
B. Patient Education Resources
• Health Facts for You
• Health Link Resources
• Learning Center
IV. References
See full guideline document for list of references.
V. Rating Scheme For The Strength Of The Recommendations
Category Description
Ia Evidence obtained from meta-analysis or systematic review of randomized
controlled trial.
Ib Evidence obtained from at least one randomized controlled trial.
IIa Evidence obtained from at least one well-designed controlled study without
randomization.
IIb Evidence obtained from at least one other type of well-designed quasi-
experimental study, without randomization.
III Evidence obtained from well-designed non-experimental descriptive
studies, such as comparative studies, correlation studies and case studies.
IV Evidence obtained from expert committee reports or opinions and/or
clinical experiences of respected authorities