/clinical/,/clinical/cckm-tools/,/clinical/cckm-tools/content/,/clinical/cckm-tools/content/cpg/,/clinical/cckm-tools/content/cpg/medications/,/clinical/cckm-tools/content/cpg/medications/related/,

/clinical/cckm-tools/content/cpg/medications/related/name-121110-en.cckm

201709268

page

100

UWHC,UWMF,

Clinical Hub,UW Health Clinical Tool Search,UW Health Clinical Tool Search,Clinical Practice Guidelines,Medications,Related

Intensive Care Adult Vasoactive Continuous Infusion Titration - Adult - Inpatient [18]

Intensive Care Adult Vasoactive Continuous Infusion Titration - Adult - Inpatient [18] - Clinical Hub, UW Health Clinical Tool Search, UW Health Clinical Tool Search, Clinical Practice Guidelines, Medications, Related


Delegation Protocol Number:  18 
Delegation Protocol Title: 
Intensive Care Vasoactive Continuous Infusion Titration – Adult ‐ Inpatient 
Delegation Protocol Applies To: 
UW Health critical care patient in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or the Emergency Department (ED) 
Target Patient Population: 
Any adult critical care patient requiring a titratable vasoactive agent as identified in Table 1. 
Delegation Protocol Champions: 
Jeff Wells, MD – Department of Medicine ‐ Pulmonary 
Jonathan Ketzler, MD – Department of Anesthesia 
Joshua Medow, MD – Department of Neurosurgery 
Delegation Protocol Reviewers: 
Jeff Fish, PharmD ‐ Clinical Pharmacist 
Carin Endres, PharmD ‐ Drug Policy Program 
Andrea Stapelman, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist – Trauma, Life Support 
Margaret Murray, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist – Cardiac Surgery 
Stephanie Kraus, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist – Cardiology 
Eileen Burgenske, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist – Neurosurgery 
Alazda Kaun, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist ‐ Burn 
Responsible Department: 
Department of Pharmacy 
Purpose Statement: 
To delegate authority from the attending physician to Registered Nurses (RNs) in the intensive care 
units and emergency department to titrate vasoactive agents infusions in critically ill adults and to 
provide a framework for the ordering, initiation and titration of these agents. 
Who May Carry Out This Delegation Protocol: 
Any Registered Nurse (RN) in an adult ICU or ED 
Advanced Practice Nurse Prescribers, Physician Assistants and Nurse Midwives may not delegate  
medical authority.  Orders may be pended and routed for signature to these individuals but may  
not be implemented until signed by the provider. 
Guidelines for Implementation: 
1. A physician enters an order for a vasoactive agent with an initial starting dose.  The order must
include instructions for titration per Intensive Care Vasoactive Continuous Infusion Titration – Adult
‐ Inpatient Protocol, with a targeted objective response (such as mean arterial pressure or heart
rate).  If patient status necessitates titration outside of Table 1, then the protocol cannot be
implemented.
2. The rate and frequency of dose titration is dependent upon the patient’s individual hemodynamic
Copyright © 2017 University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority
Contact: Lee Vermeulen, CCKM@uwhealth.org Last Revised: 09/2017CCKM@uwhealth.org

parameters, clinical status, and response to therapy, but will not occur more frequently than 
indicated in the “Titration Dose Increment” and “Rate of Titration” columns of Table 1. 
3. The lowest effective dose achieving the stated objective response will be utilized. The nurse records 
each dose  increase or decrease  in the  IV/IV MAR.  Vital signs will be monitored and documented 
with  each  rate  change  while  on  a  stable  continuous  infusion,  with  minimum  vital  sign 
documentation  being  hourly.  If  the  patient  requires  frequent  or  emergent  dose  titration,  the 
patient will have continuous or cycled monitoring of vital signs.  Vital signs and rate will  then be 
documented at least every 15 minutes until vital signs stable.  
4. If the dose of the vasoactive agent reaches the maximum ordered dose as listed in Table 1, the 
provider must be notified for consideration of an additional agent or to order dose escalation 
outside of the protocol. 
5. When  additional  vasoactive  agents  are  ordered  subsequent  to  the  initial  vasoactive  agent,  the 
following titration will occur: 
5.1.  The initial agent or agents will remain at the current rate 
5.2.  Subsequent vasoactive agents, except vasopressin, will be titrated up according to the  
        “Titration Dose Increment” and “Rate of Titration” columns of Table 1 
5.3. If vasopressin  is added per protocol,  it will be  initiated at the “Typical Starting Dose”  listed  in 
table 1 or per physician order, and the dose will not be titrated up without a physician order 
6. Initiation of weaning the vasoactive medication(s) to off occurs after the patient maintains their 
blood pressure at goal for 1‐2 hours or as directed after other therapies are begun. Vasoactive 
infusions will be titrated off in the reverse order as they were started unless directed by the 
physician.  Vasoactive infusions will be weaned off as indicated in the “Titration Dose Increment” 
and “Rate of Titration” columns of Table 1 based on reverse order of initiation. 
 
 
Copyright © 2017 University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority
Contact: Lee Vermeulen, CCKM@uwhealth.org Last Revised:
 
09/2017CCKM@uwhealth.org

 
 
Table 1. Vasoactive Titration Table 
 
Drug 
 
Typical Dose 
Range 
 
Typical Starting 
Dose 
 
Titration Dose 
Increment 
 
Rate of 
Titration 
Maximum ordered 
Dose  
(notify physician when 
dose reached) 
Diltiazem  1‐20 mg/hr  2.5‐5 mg/hr
b
  2.5 mg/hr  30‐60 min  20 mg/hr 
Dobutamine  2‐20 mcg/kg/min  2 mcg/kg/min  2.5 mcg/kg/min  5‐15 min  20 mcg/kg/min 
Dopamine  2‐20 mcg/kg/min  2‐5 mcg/kg/min
a
  1‐5 mcg/kg/min

1‐15 min  20 mcg/kg/min 
Epinephrine 
0.01mcg/kg/min 
to effect 
0.02‐0.1 mcg/kg/min
a
  0.01‐0.05 mcg/kg/min

1‐15 min  2 mcg/kg/min 
Esmolol  50‐300 mcg/kg/min  25‐50 mcg/kg/min
b
  50 mcg/kg/min   5‐20 min  300 mcg/kg/min 
Labetalol  5‐180 mg/hr  10 mg/hr  10 mg/hr  10‐30 min  180 mg/hr 
Milrinone 
0.375‐0.75 
mcg/kg/min 
0.375 mcg/kg/min  0.125 mcg/kg/min  15‐30 min  0.75 mcg/kg/min 
Nicardipine  2.5‐15 mg/hr  2.5‐5 mg/hr
b
  2.5 mg/hr  15‐30 min  15 mg/hr 
Nitroglycerin 
(mcg/min) 
5‐300 mcg/min  5‐10 mcg/min
b
  5‐20 mcg/min

5‐15 min  300 mcg/min 
Nitroglycerin 
(mcg/kg/min) 
0.1‐3 mcg/kg/min  0.2‐0.3 mcg/kg/min
b
  0.2‐0.5 mcg/kg/min

5‐15 min  3 mcg/kg/min 
Nitroprusside  0.1‐10 mcg/kg/min  0.1 mcg/kg/min  0.25‐0.5 mcg/kg/min

1‐15 min  10 mcg/kg/min 
Norepinephrine 
0.01 mcg/kg/min 
to effect 
0.02‐0.1 mcg/kg/min
a
  0.01‐0.05 mcg/kg/min

1‐15 min  2 mcg/kg/min 
Phenylephrine 
0.25 mcg/kg/min 
to effect 
0.25‐1 mcg/kg/min
a
  0.25‐0.5 mcg/kg/min

1‐15 min  5 mcg/kg/min 
 
Vasopressin 
(septic shock) 
 
0.01‐0.06 units/min 
 
0.03 units/min 
Do not increase rate 
without MD order. 
Wean off by 0.01 
unit/min 
 
30‐60 min 
 
0.06 units/min 
a. To treat hypotension: For patients with moderate shock (i.e: a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 50 mm Hg up to their MAP goal), the 
RN may start on the low to middle end of the range.  For patients with severe shock (i.e. MAP less than 50 mmHg), the RN may start 
 in the middle to high end of the range.  If unclear as to which dose to initiate, the RN should consult with unit pharmacist or provider. 
b. To treat hypertension: the RN may start on the high end of the range.  If using the medication for another indication and systolic blood  
pressure is <100 mmHg, the RN may start on the low end of the range.  If unclear as to which dose to initiate, the RN should consult with 
 unit pharmacist or provider. 
Copyright © 2017 University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority
Contact: Lee Vermeulen, CCKM@uwhealth.org Last Revised:
 
09/2017CCKM@uwhealth.org

 
  Order Mode: Protocol/Policy, Without Cosign 
 
References: 
1. Mullner M, Urbanek B, Havel C, Losert H, Waechter F, Gamper G. Vasopressors for shock. Cochrane 
Database Syst Rev. 2004:CD003709. 
2. Overgaard CB, Dzavik V. Inotropes and vasopressors: review of physiology and clinical use in 
cardiovascular disease. Circulation. 2008;118:1047‐1056. 
3. Ellender TJ, Skinner JC. The use of vasopressors and inotropes in the emergency medical treatment 
of shock. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2008;26:759‐786, ix. 
4. Dunser MW, Mayr AJ, Ulmer H, et al. Arginine vasopressin in advanced vasodilatory shock: a 
prospective, randomized, controlled study. Circulation. 2003;107:2313‐2319. 
5. Yancy CW, Jessup M, Bozkurt B, et al. 2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of heart 
failure: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task 
Force on Practice Guidelines. J Am Coll Cardiol. Oct 15 2013;62(16):e147‐239.Antman EM, Anbe DT, 
Armstrong PW, et al. ACC/AHA guidelines for the management of patients with ST‐elevation 
myocardial infarction; A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 
Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Committee to Revise the 1999 Guidelines for the Management of 
patients with acute myocardial infarction). J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004;44:E1‐E211. 
6. Marik PE, Varon J. Hypertensive crises: challenges and management. Chest. 2007;131:1949‐1962. 
7. Rhoney D, Peacock WF. Intravenous Therapy for hypertensive emergencies, part 1. Am J Health Syst 
Pharm. 2009;66:1343‐1352. 
8. Dellinger RP, Levy MM, Rhodes A, et al. Surviving Sepsis Campaign: international guidelines for 
management of severe sepsis and septic shock, 2012. Intensive Care Med. Feb 2013;39(2):165‐228. 
9. De Backer D, Biston P, Devriendt J, et al. Comparison of dopamine and norepinephrine in the 
treatment of shock. N Engl J Med. Mar 4 2010;362(9):779‐789. 
10. Curran MP, Robinson DM, Keating GM. Intravenous nicardipine: its use in the short‐term treatment 
of hypertension and various other indications. Drugs. 2006;66(13):1755‐1782. 
 
Collateral Documents/Tools: 
UW Health Vasoactive Continuous Infusions in Adult Patients – Adult – Inpatient Clinical Practice 
Guideline 
 
Approved By: 
UWHC Critical Care Committee: June 2010; August 2014*; June 2017 
UW Health Nursing Practice Committee: June 2010; September 2014*; August 2017 
UWHC Pharmacy Practice Committee: May 2010; October 2014*; June 2017 
UWCH Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee: May 2010; September 2014*, August 2017  
UWHC Medical Board: June 2010; October 2014*; *September 2017 
 
Effective Date:  September 2017 
 
Scheduled for Review:  September 2020 
 Expedited Review Process 
Copyright © 2017 University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority
Contact: Lee Vermeulen, CCKM@uwhealth.org Last Revised:
 
09/2017CCKM@uwhealth.org